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Najtraženije: Handbook, Distribution, Wind, Grid


J. Jurasz - Complementarity of Variable Renewable Energy Sources

Complementarity of Variable Renewable Energy Sources 1st Edition
Editors: Jakub Jurasz, Alexandre Beluco

No. of pages: 744
Language: English
Published: May 23, 2022
Imprint: Academic Press
Paperback ISBN: 9780323855273



Complementarity of Variable Renewable Energy Sources consolidates current developments on the subject, addressing all technical advances, presenting new mapping results, and bringing new insights for the continuation of research and implementation on this fascinating topic. By answering questions such as How can complementarity be used in the operation of large interconnected systems?, What is the real applicability potential of energetic complementarity?, and How will it impact energy generation systems?, this title is useful for all researchers, academic and students investigating the topic of renewable energy complementarity in systems.

In just over a decade, the subject of energy complementarity has experienced a growing presence and understanding by researchers and managers of energy resources looking to enhance energy systems. Early research proposed methods to quantify complementarity, the effects of complementarity on performance of hybrid systems, and how to identify and map complementarity between solar energy, wind energy and hydroelectric energy systems.

Key features
Includes chapter maps to visualize system performance under different complementarity indexes
Addresses complementarity in the operation of large and small to medium-sized hybrid systems
Provides methods for determining complementarity between various energy sources

About the editors

Jakub K. Jurasz is an assistant professor at Wrocław University of Science and Technology, Poland. He is a former postdoctoral researcher at MDH University, Västerås, Sweden, as a member of the Future Energy Center Group coordinated by Prof. Jinuye Yan. His PhD thesis was dedicated to the optimal operation of solar–wind-pumped storage systems. Currently, he continues his research in the area of renewable energy sources, power system transformation, and water–food–energy nexus.

Alexandre Beluco is a professor at Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. His doctoral thesis was dedicated to the study of energetic complementarity, and he was one of the pioneers in addressing this topic. His research work is focused on hybrid energy systems, and more recently on hybrid storage systems, looking for the effects of complementarity and also for solutions to local problems, among other topics.

Table of contents

Preface
Chapter 1 Research trends in renewable energy complementarity: a bibliometric analysis
1.1 Introduction
1.2 Methodology
1.3 Results and discussion
1.4 Conclusion
Appendix A
Appendix B
References
Chapter 2 Metrics and indices used for the evaluation of energetic complementarity—a review
2.1 Introduction: metrics and indices
2.2 Metrics and indices that assess complementarity in time or space
2.3 Metrics that assess the reliability of the cogeneration
2.4 Complementarity between more than two sources
2.5 Final notes
References
Chapter 3 Multidimensional metrics for complementarity
3.1 Introduction
3.2 Fluctuation evaluation indicators
3.3 Complementarity evaluation index system
3.4 Evaluation index system for the contribution of complementarity to power system
3.5 Refined evaluation method for complementary characteristics
3.6 Conclusion
List of Abbreviations
Reference
Chapter 4 Geographic information systems (GIS) tools in complementarity research—estimation and visualization
4.1 Introduction
4.2 Geographic information systems tools employed for assessing energetic complementarity
4.3 Assessing complementarity using geographic information systems: previous studies worldwide
4.4 Final notes
References
Chapter 5 A survey on temporal and spatial complementarity between wind and solar resources along the coast of northeastern Brazil
5.1 Introduction
5.2 Temporal complementarity
5.3 Spatial complementarity
5.4 Coast of northeastern Brazil
5.5 Data considered in this study
5.6 Results and discussion
5.7 Final remarks
Acknowledgments
References
Chapter 6 Complementarity beyond correlation
6.1 Introduction
6.2 Quantifying complementarity
6.3 Examples
6.4 Case of study: complementarity in the Colombian electricity system
6.5 Discussion and final remarks
Funding
References
Chapter 7 Global complementarity of renewable energy sources
7.1 Introduction
7.2 Methodology
7.3 Results and discussion
7.4 Complementarity between solar and wind energy on the global scale
7.5 Conclusions
Appendix
Acknowledgment
References
Chapter 8 On the role of resource complementarity in siting renewable power plants and its impact on power system design and economics
8.1 Introduction
8.2 Methodology
8.3 Case study
8.4 Results
8.5 Conclusion
References
Chapter 9 Complementary behavior of solar and wind energy based on the reported data on the European level—a country-level analysis
9.1 Introduction
9.2 Analysis
9.3 Discussion and conclusions
Acknowledgments
References
Chapter 10 Meteorological assessment of coupled wind–solar power generation regimes in Spain
10.1 Introduction
10.2 Data and methods
10.3 Results
10.4 Discussion, summary, and conclusions
Acknowledgments
References
Chapter 11 Impact of climate change on wind and solar energy sources complementarity: a case study of the northeast Brazilian region
11.1 Introduction
11.2 Preliminary concepts
11.3 Methodology
11.4 Case study
11.5 Final considerations on the case study
11.6 Conclusions
References
Chapter 12 A comparative study of correlation coefficients used to assess the solar and wind complementarity in Mexico
12.1 Introduction
12.2 Energetic complementarity studies
12.3 Correlation coefficients
12.4 Canonical correlation analysis
12.5 Cross-correlation
12.6 Wind and solar data
12.7 Results and discussion
12.8 Conclusions
References
Chapter 13 Short-term complementarity of utility-scale solar and wind power plants
13.1 Introduction
13.2 Case study
13.3 Methodology
13.4 Results and discussion
13.5 Conclusions
References
Chapter 14 Designing hybrid systems operation in the context of resources complementarity
14.1 Introduction
14.2 The involved cities in this study
14.3 Mathematical modeling and optimization
14.4 Results and discussion
14.5 Conclusions
Acknowledgments
References
Chapter 15 Complementarity analysis of hybrid solar–wind power systems` operation
15.1 Introduction
15.2 Solar and wind power in Algeria
15.3 System modeling and data analysis
15.4 Optimal sizing and operation
15.5 Probability of low generation events
15.6 Conclusions
References
Chapter 16 Off-grid hybrid systems reliability and transmission line utilization from the perspective of renewables complementarity
16.1 Introduction
16.2 Renewable energy sources and power grid status in Algeria
16.3 Data and methods
16.4 Short discussion on complementarity
16.5 Off-grid renewables-based systems
16.6 Hybrid power stations and transmission line utilization
16.7 Future perspective and challenges
16.8 Conclusions
References
Chapter 17 Complementary concentrated solar power—wind hybrid system with thermal storage and ORC
17.1 Introduction
17.2 System description
17.3 Methodology and models
17.4 Results and discussion
17.5 Conclusions
References
Chapter 18 Complementarity of renewable energy sources in the context of the heating sector
18.1 Renewables in heating sector
18.2 Simulating system operation
18.3 Solar and wind performance in heat supply
18.4 Concluding remarks
References
Chapter 19 Insight into the potential of the energy production by hybrid system: small hydropower and solar photovoltaics
19.1 Introduction
19.2 Basics about hydropower energy and solar photovoltaic plants
19.3 Sizing methodologies
19.4 Conclusion
References
Chapter 20 Operations management of large hydro–PV hybrid power plants: case studies in China
20.1 Introduction
20.2 Robust hydroelectric unit commitment considering integration of large-scale photovoltaic power
20.3 Optimal daily generation scheduling of a hydro–PV power plant
20.4 Long-term reservoir operation to adapt to large-scale photovoltaic power generation
References
Chapter 21 Small hydropower plants proliferation and fluvial ecosystem conservation Nexus
21.1 Renewable energy agenda and small hydropower proliferation
21.2 Fluvial ecosystem conservation and hydrological alteration
21.3 Environmental flows significance and methods overview
21.4 Concluding remarks
References
Chapter 22 Complementarity and application of renewable energy sources in the marine environment
22.1 Introduction
22.2 Possibilities of the complementary of the renewables in the marine environment
22.3 Case study of marine complementarity in the Baltic Sea
22.4 Discussion on the possible applications of marine renewables
Author contributions
References
Chapter 23 Complementarity between rare renewable energies
23.1 Introduction
23.2 What are we talking about?
23.3 Tapping untapped, using discarded
23.4 What about complementarity?
23.5 Concluding remark
References
Chapter 24 Renewable energies in the context of the water–food–energy nexus
24.1 Introduction to the nexus: history, concepts, models, criticisms, challenges, and opportunities
24.2 Water footprint of renewable energies
24.3 Floating photovoltaic systems
24.4 Photovoltaic water-pumping systems
24.5 Agrivoltaics
24.6 Bioenergy: water consumption and land for energy versus land for food
24.7 Wastewater systems
24.8 Conclusions
Acknowledgments
References
Chapter 25 Applications of renewable energy sources in agriculture from complementarity perspective
25.1 Introduction
25.2 Agricultural applications powered by complementary RESs
25.3 Conclusions and future prospects
Acknowledgment
References
Chapter 26 Governing complementarity to enhance environmental, economic, and social benefits of renewable energy
26.1 Introduction
26.2 Renewables
26.3 Complementarity
26.4 Multi-actor participation and governance
26.5 Conclusion
References
Chapter 27 Dancing with renewables: a holistic perspective encompassing the role of the demand side
27.1 Introduction
27.2 Discussion
27.3 Conclusions
References
Chapter 28 Teaching about complementarity – proposal of classes for university students – including exercises
28.1 Research trends in renewable energy complementarity: a bibliometric analysis
28.2 Metrics and indices used for the evaluation of energetic complementarity – a review
28.3 Multidimensional metrics for complementarity
28.4 Geographic information systems (GIS) tools in complementarity research – estimation and visualization
28.5 A survey on temporal and spatial complementarity between wind and solar resources along the coast of northeastern Brazil
28.6 Complementarity beyond correlation
28.7 Global complementarity of renewable energy sources
28.8 On the role of resource complementarity in siting renewable power plants and its impact on power system design and economics
28.9 Complementary behavior of solar and wind energy based on the reported data on the European level – a country-level analysis
28.10 Meteorological assessment of coupled wind-solar power generation regimes in Spain
28.11 Impact of climate change on wind and solar energy sources complementarity: a case study of the northeast Brazilian region
28.12 A comparative study of correlation coefficients used to assess the solar and wind complementarity in Mexico
28.13 Short-term complementarity of utility-scale solar and wind power plants
28.14 Designing hybrid systems considering resources complementarity
28.15 Complementarity analysis for hybrid solar-wind power systems` operation
28.16 Off-grid hybrid systems reliability and transmission line utilization from the perspective of renewables complementarity
28.17 Complementary concentrated solar power - wind hybrid system with thermal storage and ORC
28.18 Complementarity of renewable energy sources in the context of heating sector
28.19 Insight into the potential of the energy production by hybrid system 'small hydropower power plant and solar photovoltaic power plant'
28.20 Operations management of large hydro-PV hybrid power plants: case studies in China
28.21 Small hydropower plants proliferation and fluvial ecosystem conservation nexus
28.22 Complementarity and application of renewable energy sources in the marine environment
28.23 Complementarity between rare renewable energies
28.24 Complementarity in the context of water-food-energy nexus
28.25 The role and applications of renewable energies in agriculture from the complementarity perspective
28.26 Governing complementarity to enhance environmental, economic, and social benefits of renewable energy
28.27 Dancing with renewables: a holistic perspective encompassing the role of the demand side
References
Index


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